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Specialist services available:-

Advanced cardiac procedures and interventions

alcohol septal ablation ASD/PFO closure coronary flow wire/ functional flow reserve left atrial appendage closure valvuloplasty  

Alcohol septal ablation

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex type of heart disease that affects the heart muscle. It causes thickening of the heart muscle (especially the ventricles, or lower heart chambers), left ventricular stiffness, mitral valve changes and cellular changes. Thickening of the heart muscle (myocardium) occurs most commonly at the septum. The septum is the muscular wall that separates the left and right side of the heart. Problems occur when the septum between the heart’s lower chambers, or ventricles, is thickened. The thickened septum may cause a narrowing that can block or reduce the blood flow from the left ventricle to the aorta - a condition called “outflow tract obstruction.” The ventricles must pump harder to overcome the narrowing or blockage. This type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be called hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) Alcohol septal ablation is a procedure to reduce the thickness of the muscle wall. The ablation procedure is performed in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory. First, the small coronary artery that supplies blood flow to the upper part of the septum is located during a cardiac catheterisation procedure. A balloon catheter is inserted into the artery and inflated. A contrast agent is injected to locate the thickened septal wall that narrows the passageway from the left ventricle to the aorta. When the bulge is located, a tiny amount of pure alcohol is injected through the catheter. The alcohol kills the cells on contact, causing the septum to shrink back to a more normal size over the following months, widening the passage for blood flow